You Win Watercress!

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Published by Neal Porter Books/Holiday House

Many thank again to Andrea Wang for a wonderful chat about your touching picture book, WATERCRESS.

Today, I am delighted to announce that we have not three, but six winners!

Congratulations to the winners of the Frog on a Dime WATERCRESS drawing!

Ann Finkelstein

Lauri Fortino

Kathy Meister

Rebecca Van Slyke

Elizabeth Westra

Lisa Wheeler

Andrea and I both appreciated appreciated your kind words and comments. Thank you so much!

(Now, for a bit of light housekeeping!)

Winners, to ensure your picture book goes to the correct address, please send me a message via the Contact page.

If you would like your book personalized for a child or friend, please let me know that information too.

If you’d like your book sent directly to your special someone, that’s no problem. Simply provide the address. (In the U.S., please!)

I have always believed that poems beg to be read aloud, even if the reader is in a world all her own. ~ J. Patrick Lewis

Giving Thanks for Writers & Watercress – A Chat with Andrea Wang

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Driving through Ohio in an old Pontiac, a young girl’s parents stop suddenly when they spot something growing in a ditch by the side of the road…watercress!

With an old paper bag and some rusty scissors, the whole family wades into the muck to collect as much of the muddy, snail-covered plant as they can.

At first, it’s embarrassing. Why can’t her family get food at the grocery store?

But when her mother shares the story of her family’s life in China, the girl learns to appreciate the fresh food they foraged.

Together, they make a new memory of watercress in this tender story inspired by the author’s childhood memories and illustrated by Caldecott Honor artist Jason Chin.

(Description source: Jacket flap, WATERCRESS by Andrea Wang)

Author Andrea Wang

Here we are, Thanksgiving Week, and I am feeling so grateful for time to chat with my extra special guest–Andrea Wang!

Andrea is the award-winning author of The Nian Monster (APALA Honor, PW starred review) and Magic Ramen: The Story of Momofuku Ando (JLG Gold Standard Selection, Sakura Medal, Freeman Book Award Honor, SLJ starred review). She has two books releasing in 2021: Watercress (JLG Gold Standard Selection, starred reviews from Kirkus, SLJ, PW, Horn Book); and The Many Meanings of Meilan, her debut middle grade novel. Her work explores culture, creative thinking, and identity. She is also the author of seven nonfiction titles for the library and school market. Andrea holds an M.S. in Environmental Science and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing for Young People. She lives in the Denver area with her family.

Welcome, Andrea. Thank you for stopping by Frog on a Dime. I’m so excited! Let’s hop right in and talk about your latest picture book WATERCRESS . . .

I see you dedicated WATERCRESS in memory of your parents and described them as “immigrants and inspirations.” In what way did they inspire you?

It takes an enormous amount of courage to give up everyone and everything you’ve ever known to go live in a place where you don’t speak the language, all in pursuit of a better life for yourself and your family. Finally understanding the hardships and sacrifices my parents made inspired me to not only pursue my dream of writing, but also to be vulnerable and emotionally honest in my writing.

That’s beautiful.

What do you feel is gained when parents and grandparents open up to their children/grandchildren about family history and memories?

I talk about this in my Author’s Note, so I thought I’d share that part of it here: “…it’s important, too, for children to understand their family history. Perhaps if I had known about the hardships they had faced, I would have been more compassionate as a child. Maybe I would have felt more empathy and less anger. More pride in my heritage and less shame. Memories have the power to inform, to inspire, and to heal.”

Those are great insights, Andrea. Thank you.

What do you hope young readers take away? What about parents? Teachers?

I hope all readers see that, no matter where you are from or how you identify, we all share a common humanity. You may not be a child of immigrants or have had to pick food from the wild, but everyone has felt embarrassment, shame, and the feeling of not belonging. The emotions in WATERCRESS are universal. We need to be kinder to each other, to reach for understanding rather than react out of ignorance.

No surprise, next I’d like to ask a few questions on behalf of my fellow writers, okay?

How long after you wrote WATERCRESS did you feel ready to share it with anyone?

In its current form, I think I shared the manuscript with a few critique partners right after I wrote it. Mostly, I wanted to get their feedback about what they thought it was–just a poem, or could it be a picture book? They thought I should send it to my agent immediately, so that’s what I did. But it took me about eight years to write this version of WATERCRESS and I did share those previous versions with critique partners, so it was an iterative process, like writing always is.

I’m so glad you persevered–and that you listened to your critique partners!

Published by Neal Porter Books/Holiday House
ISBN-13: 978-0-8234-4624-7

What was your approach to this autobiographical story compared to previous manuscripts?

I don’t know that I’d call it an “approach,” because that sounds like I went into this project with a plan and that’s not how it was at all. The first version of this story was in the form of a personal essay for adults, which I thought would be a good format since I was using my own memories as material. But that piece didn’t really work, so I rewrote it years later as a fictional picture book. That version was from a 3rd person POV and it was better, but too long and lacking an emotional heart. Several more years later, I found the perfect mentor text (A DIFFERENT POND by Bao Phi and illustrated by Thi Bui) and revised the manuscript again, returning to 1st person POV and paring away every single word that felt extraneous, so that it came out in free verse.

Your use of spare text meant you needed to lean on the illustrator, Jason Chin, to communicate for you at times, including one of the story’s most poignant scenes. That’s a challenge for many picture book writers. How did you reach to that level of trust?

While I was writing this free-verse version of Watercress, I honestly wasn’t thinking about the illustrator or the illustrations at all. I was writing for myself, and I knew exactly what I meant by each line. I did consciously add a couple of clues (“Mom never talks about her China family,” and “Mom never told us what happened to him.”) leading up to that scene you’re referring to, so the reader is primed for the reveal. I also went back and made sure that every description in the text conveyed character, emotion, and/or setting that was necessary to the story. Everything else got pared away. I would advise PB writers to write illustration notes in their first drafts, then go back to each note and ask if it’s really necessary to the story. Does it add depth to a character, convey emotion, or establish atmosphere? Would the story and the reader suffer if the information was omitted? If not, then delete! If yes, then try to work the information into the text using vivid verbs, metaphors, and adjectives. I always aim to not have any illustration notes in my manuscripts.

Thank you, Andrea. If I’m ever brave enough to attempt another picture book, I’m going to follow your brilliant advice!

And now, one last question, this time for my curious foodie friends . . .

Do you prepare watercress now for your family?

In WATERCRESS, the family eats the vegetable stir-fried, which is how I prefer it. I don’t follow a formal recipe since it’s so simple, but this is how I make it:

Stir-fried Watercress

1-2 tsp cooking oil

1 bunch fresh watercress, rinsed and drained

1 clove garlic, sliced

salt

toasted sesame seeds for garnish (optional)

In a wok or large frying pan, heat the oil over medium-high to high heat. Add garlic and stir quickly with a spatula.

After a few seconds, add the watercress and continue stirring for 1-2 minutes, until the watercress has changed color and the stems are tender.

If the bottom of the wok runs dry, a couple of tablespoons of water can be added to keep the vegetables from scorching.

Add salt to taste and transfer to a serving dish.

Sprinkle with sesame seeds and enjoy!

Andrea, thank you so much. It’s been a delight and an honor to have you as a guest today.

A Bonus Thanksgiving Surprise! Win a Copy of WATERCRESS!

As an expression of thanks, Frog on a Dime invites you to enter for a chance to win your very own personalized copy of WATERCRESS, signed by both Andrea Wang and Caldecott honoree Jason Chin.

TO ENTER, simply leave a comment below.

The names of THREE lucky winners will be drawn at Noon on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 25.

The secret of happiness is to see all the marvels of the world, and never to forget the drops of oil on the spoon. ~ Paulo Coelho

Thanksgiving Surprises for You

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Thanksgiving Week 2021 is going to be extra thank-filled.

Artwork by Vicky Lorencen

Frog on a Dime will host a very special guest. I can’t wait for you to meet her!

PLUS (yes, there’s even more my little pumpkin tarts!) you will have a chance to win your own personalized copy of our guest’s amazing new picture book!

You’ll thank yourself when you hop on over to Frog on a Dime Monday, November 22.

See you then!

I want to thank you for the profound joy I’ve had in the in the thought of you. ~ Rosie Alison

Photo by Vicky Lorencen

Congrats, Summer Open House Winner!

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Oh what a pleasure it is to proclaim the winner of this year’s Summer Open House giveaway drawing.

Congratulations go to Lori McElrath-Eslick! You will receive your very own, one of a kind doodle, personalized with your initials or those of someone you love.

Please send me a message with your preference and mailing address, and I will get to doodling!

Heartfelt thanks go to everyone who entered the drawing. Your comments and kindness are most appreciated. I will think of you as I doodle more curlicues, spirals and paisley patterns. I hope you will doodle away the summer too!

Doodle by Vicky Lorencen

Bees do have a smell, you know, and if they don’t they should, for their feet are dusted with spices from a million flowers. ~ Ray Bradbury

You’re Invited – Summer Open House 2021

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Doodle by Vicky Lorencen

Welcome! Welcome!

Come on in!

To taggle along with “What a Doodle Can Do for You,” I invite you to visit Frog on a Dime and enjoy taking a look around. Snoop all you like. (Yes, you can even look under the lily pads!) Read posts, check out the quote collection, the inspiration page for young writers and much more. It’s all yours to explore.

While you’re here, please leave a comment on whatever post speaks most to you.

Your comment is your ticket to entry into Frog on a Dime’s Annual (Virtual) Summer Open House giveaway!

You can win:

A swirly whirly one-of-a-kind doodle created with care by yours truly. If you choose, your doodle can be personalized with your initials or the initials of someone you love incorporated into the design.

To enter the 2021 Frog on a Dime Summer Open House Giveaway:

Simply leave a comment on any post–past or present, whatever suits your fancy!

Deadline to enter:

High Noon (EST) on Wednesday, August 11.

(And ahem, leave a comment on more than one post, and you’ll get an EXTRA chance to win!)

In spite of everything, I shall rise again; I will take up my pencil, which I have forsaken in my great discouragement, and I will go on with my drawing. ~ Vincent Van Gogh

A strong visual imagination acts as a magnet to draw the visualised into reality. ~ Anupama Garg

What a Doodle Can Do for You

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By Vicky Lorencen

The other day I stumbled on a fun fact about presidential doodles.

(Hmm. Something about that doesn’t sound quite right.)

Let me start again.

See, I was reading this article from Harvard Health Publishing about the thinking benefits of doodling. That makes more sense, right?

And according to the article’s author Srini Pillay, MD, “Even American presidents have found themselves sketching away: 26 of 44 American Presidents doodled, from Theodore Roosevelt, who doodled animals and children, to Ronald Reagan, who doodled cowboys and football players, and John F. Kennedy, who doodled dominoes.”

Doodle by Vicky Lorencen
By Vicky Lorencen

A writer’s job doesn’t exactly involve executing laws, appointing federal officials or negotiating with Slovakia. So, why do I need to doodle? For me, doodling is a way to get out of my own way. If I’m writing and get stuck (more like, “when” I get stuck), I pause and pick up a pen. Mindlessly making swirls and random, unpredictable designs is a practice that calms me. It provides a chance to hush my harsh inner critic because doodling has no right or wrong. It just do.

Doodling can helps me puzzle out a plot predicament or conjure a more fitting name for a character I’ve become better acquainted with. It keeps the gnarly wheels in my noggin’ cranking, but in a more productive way versus self-sabotage.

Doodling can also be a delightful way to douse stress. Allowing yourself to get lost in an in-the-moment design can relieve tension by putting a distance between you and fret. Worries about your writing and whether you can move ahead are nudged to the margin while you push that pen. You can return to your project mentally replenished.

My Little Strawberry Rhubarb Tart, if you’ve never tried doodling as a companion to your creative process, I encourage you to give it a try. The only way you can go wrong is to think about what you are doodling whilst you do it. Pretend you’re giving the paper a side glance. It’s just there to catch the ink. And you don’t have to use fancy paper or snazzy pens. (If you take a look at the doodle below, you’ll notice I did it on nothing-fancy notebook paper.) You don’t have to worry about composition, what color to use or creating “art.” Just free your pen and the mental rest will follow.

Want to delve deeper into doodling?

Learn more about the benefits of doodling from Monica Harris, The Doodling Duchess.

By Vicky Lorencen

She drew the things that stuck to her mind, the things that caught her attention and, specially, the things she wasn’t capable of understanding fully. But she hadn’t even realized it. Art had become her way of processing reality. ~ Zoe Haslie

Everybody has inner creativity that has been lost amongst the hustle and bustle of everyday life. The small part of us that provides balance and calm, and releases our creative side, is smothered and in risk of dying completely. ~ Lana Karr

Be gentle on yourself

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Doodle by Vicky Lorencen

To say mathematics is not my thing is like saying cliff diving is not a giraffe’s thing.

And yet, I am compelled to confirm an important number, so I do the math.

2021 – 1963 = 58

Yep, there it is.

I’m turning 58 years old this year. Yeesh. I’ve never been so old.

And with every passing year, I feel the mounting pressure to be published. That pressure is entirely self-inflicted, along with the self-condemnation and self-doubt. I’m really quite self-sufficient that way.

Year marker 58 was anticipated to be much the same. And then, I heard a few simple words from a wise literary agent that hit a reset button I forgot I even had.

The words?

“Be gentle on yourself.”

It’s easy to be gentle on others, isn’t it. It’s no effort to remind them how genuinely talented they are, and easy to encourage them to look back at how far they’ve come.

Maybe I can give it a go with myself too. It will be a squabblesome, disorienting pursuit I’m certain. But being gentle on myself sure sounds like a welcome birthday gift.

Say, you’re having a birthday this year, aren’t you? Why not treat yourself to some gentleness too.

Be gentle on yourself. ~ Kirby Kim, literary agent with Janklow & Nesbit

Follow your compass, not your clock. ~ Alvina Ling, VP, Editor-in-Chief, Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Learn to be kind to yourself. Let your mind free, close your eyes, breathe deeply and remain calm. Life is majestic and meaningful enough. ~ Shaa Zainol



Congrats Octiversary Giveaway Winner!

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Thank you times eight to everyone who joined in celebrating Frog on a Dime’s Octiversary! How encouraging to note your many accomplishments of the past year. And, given the tilt-a-whirl of 2020, every step forward–or even the ability to hold on–is all the more impressive! If you have not done so already, I hope you will make time to celebrate your progress, persistence and plucky pertinaciousness. (How’s that for alliteration? I’m exhausted. Where’s my cookie?)

Photo by Vicky Lorencen

And now, my little puff pastries, I am pleased to announce the winner of

Frog on a Dime’s Octiversary Giveaway.

Congratulations to Rebecca Van Slyke!

A box filled with not one, but eight prizes will be coming your way. You can expect to receive it in January to lighten mid-winter blues and start your new year with fresh resources for your 2021 creative pursuits.

Wishing you all a season of peaceful, mindful moments, and genuine joy in the year to come.

Celebrate when you’re half done,
And the finish won’t be half as fun
. ~ Lemony Snicket

Happy Octiversary!

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Things have been on the quiet side this year here at Frog on a Dime, but we still have reasons to celebrate–including this little blog’s 8th anniversary (also known as an octiversary! (And yes, that’s a made up word.)) Can you believe it, my little ginger snaps?

In keeping with tradition (yes! something normal!), we will honor this special occasion with presents–for YOU. All you need to do is enter the 8th Octiversary Giveaway, and if your name is drawn, a box of delightful “stuff” will be headed your way postage haste! (Sorry. You are not allowed to know what the 8-part prize is ahead of time. An octopus? No! Too obvious. And too arm-y.)

The drawing deadline is Noon (EST) on Friday, December 18. (Of course, it’s a date with an 8!)

You can enter here in the reply section or on Facebook. (Limit one entry per person, but you can still comment on both.)

Your entry must include at least one writing-related accomplishment from 2020. Hold on! Read the examples! Examples of accomplishments include (but are not limited to) I signed with an agent, I submitted a manuscript to an agent or editor, I sold a manuscript, I finally got my writing files in order, I had a book come out, I joined a critique group, I did research in preparation for a non-fiction project, I took an online course related to writing, I started a new project, I revisited a WIP, I let someone read my work and give me feedback, I encouraged other writers, AND the BEST ACCOMPLISHMENT OF ALL–I did not give up!!

Disclaimer: To be eligible to participate in this contest, entrants must be residents in good standing in any Earth-related location. Entering the giveaway drawing may induce a sense of anticipation. Employees of Frog on a Dime, of which there are none, must keep their mitts off the prizes unless expressly asked to handle for the purpose of packing items for the winner. No purchase is necessary to enter, which is good since we’re not selling anything. On Friday, December 18, 2020, a winner will be selected at random from among valid entries. Frog on a Dime is not responsible for any liability arising directly, or even, sheesh, like remotely, from use of the prizes. Odds of winning are pretty darn good.

“Moment by moment, in life’s winter

life froze

Echoing a history of blues,

a milestone rose.”

― Sandeep N Tripathi

Congrats to the Summer Open House Giveaway Winner!

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Many thanks to everyone who hopped in for Frog on a Dime’s 2020 Summer Open House. I hope you enjoyed the new features to make the site easier to navigate and search, my little raspberry lemonades. If you missed it, be sure to check out the NEW Rejection Recovery page. (Or at the very least, take comfort in knowing it’s there when/if you need it!)

Photo by Vicky Lorencen

And now . . . [cue drum roll, please]

I am pleased to announce the winner of this year’s

Summer Open House Giveaway!

ELIZABETH WESTRA

Elizabeth, you will receive not one but TWO personally autographed copies of Rachel Anderson’s debut novel THE PUPPY PREDICAMENT–one for you to enjoy and one to share with a young reader you love. Your prize package will also include a journal for capturing ideas while you’re summer daydreaming AND a surprise! Congratulations! Thank you for entering.

Rachel Anderson, author of THE PUPPY PREDICAMENT, published by Late November Literary

Please be sure to read the giveaway disclaimer below (you know, for legal purposes and stuff).

Disclaimer(s): No purchase necessary (or even an option). Shipping & handling included. Safe when used as directed. Do not submerge. Batteries not included. Dryclean only. Frog on a Dime is furnishing this Prize Package “as is.” None of the authors, contributors, agents, editors, miscreants, vandals, ambidextrous nose miners, or anyone else connected with Frog on a Dime, in any way whatsoever, can be held responsible for your (mis)use of the contents of the Prize Package. Remain seated until the ride has come to a complete stop. Do not refrigerate after opening. Contents may settle during shipment. Prize Package sold by weight, not by volume. Frog on a Dime does not provide any warranty of the item(s) whatsoever, whether expressed, implied, or statutory (whatever that is), including, but not limited to, any warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose or any warranty that the contents of the item will be error-free (because). Use at your own risk. Subject to approval. Driver does not carry cash. No substitutions. Do not fold, staple or mutilate. Some restrictions apply (but you can’t make me say what). Void where prohibited. Employees must wash hands. For off-road use only. All terms and conditions shall be rendered null and void on a whim. If state laws apply to you, some or all of the above disclaimers, exclusions, or limitations may not apply to you and you may have additional rights. (Go You!) I know you are but what am I. This tag may not be removed except by the consumer under penalty of law. (Ooo, scary!) See store for details.

Photo by Vicky Lorencen

Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language

Henry James